Faculty

Lewis Gordon: The Chronical of Higher Education

Check out Professor and Department Head Lewis Gordon in a recent article published on The Chronicle of Higher Education titled “A Philosopher Laughs at Death — and the Public Listens.” Gordon discusses the German philosopher Martin Heidegger and his impact on society today.

**Excerpt from article**

Martin Heidegger exemplifies values suitable for people so enwrapped in themselves that they treat their own death as the end of the world,” he told me. “We really don’t need Heidegger today. We didn’t need him then, in his rector lectures at Freiburg in 1933, with his callous investment in cruel charismatic leadership as a form of salvation. Indeed, I would go so far as to argue we never needed him. We need people who transcend self-absorption, psychotic and sociopathic indifference to the suffering of others, and delusions of importance from societal systems designed to support their limited relationship to reality. We need compassion, courage — something Heidegger lacked — and a clear understanding of institutions of power.

 

Ayanna De’Vante Spencer: Believing Black Girl Survivors?

Check out Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ayanna De'Vante Spencer, in The Review's recent articled titled "Believing Black Girl Survivors?" Spencer addresses unjust treatment of Black female survivors, incorporating the justice system and criminalizing survivors over supporting them. 

Tracy Llanera: “Yes, You Do Deserve a Little Treat”

Check out Assistant Professor Tracy Llanera's recent article in The New York Times, "Yes, You Do Deserve a Little Treat"

*Excerpt*

Tracy Llanera, 35, a philosophy professor at the University of Connecticut who studies nihilism, said that this treat-forward approach is one way people are reclaiming some of the freedom and stability that has been lost since early 2020.

“In the Covid pandemic, the thing that confirms that you’re suffering from existential nihilism is the lack of control,” Ms. Llanera said.

Amid these feelings of ongoing helplessness and grief, she said, people try to find consistent and reliable pleasures.

“Something about treat culture is that you’re always regularly going to get the treat,” she added. “You can depend on that, at least. There’s a guarantee that this small little ritual that you have every week will at least satiate something in you.”

Tracy Llanera: “I Am An American Philosopher”

Check out Assistant Professor Tracy Llanera's recent interview with the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy (SAAP), "I Am An American Philosopher."

*Excerpt*

The pragmatist tradition has no problem about being level-headed and getting muddy. There’s no bizarre or elitist hang-up in using (and re-forging) concepts from philosophy or other disciplines to make sense of contemporary issues or to promote social amelioration. As an approach, I’ve found pragmatism to be useful and liberating, whether I’m thinking about existential despair, or the words we use, or how hate festers in people.

Lewis Gordon: LARB Radio Hour

Check out Professor and Department Head Lewis Gordon on The Los Angeles Review of Books Radio Hour with Eric Newman and Medaya Ocher.

In this episode Professor Gordon discusses his new book, Fear of Black Consciousness, and the historical development of racialized Blackness and the larger issues this type of consciousness leads too. Gordon also discusses the responses Black and non-Black communities display in contemporary struggles for dignity and freedom.

To listen: Click Here 

APA Appoints Heather Battaly New Journal of the APA Editor-in-Chief

Heather Battaly

Congratulations to Professor Heather Battaly, who has been appointed the new Journal of the APA Editor-in-Chief by the American Philosophical Association. Check out the article here.

Published quarterly, the Journal of the American Philosophical Association provides a platform for original work in all areas of philosophy. The journal aims to publish compelling papers written in a way that can be appreciated by philosophers of every persuasion.

Lewis Gordon: “Fear of Black Consciousness”

Check out Professor and Department Head Lewis Gordon on WAMAC’S Northeast Public Radio show “The Roundtable.”

In this episode Professor Gordon discusses his new book, Fear of Black Consciousness, and the historical development of racialized Blackness and the larger issues this type of consciousness leads too. Gordon also discusses the responses Black and non-Black communities display in contemporary struggles for dignity and freedom.

To listen: Click Here 

Jane Gordon: “Post Rosa: Letters Against Barbarism”

Check out affiliate professor Jane Gordon's contribution to Post Rosa: Letters Against Barbarism edited by Hjalmar Jorge Joffre-Eichhorn.

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Post Rosa: Letters Against Barbarism is a collection of letter exchanges in conversation with Rosa Luxemburg, in the year of her 150th anniversary. Twenty “Luxemburgians” from across the globe engage in vivid correspondence, with reference to and reflections about Luxemburg and the times we live in, as understood through their own bodies and geopolitical locations, and informed by an epistemology of both head and heart.

Conceived in the midst of a barbarous(ly handled) pandemic, this life-affirming book aims to be a source of affective-intellectual inspiration and encouragement to commit our words and lives to the struggle against barbarism and for socialism.

Cover of the book "Post Rosa"