Author: Malley, Mary

Lewis Gordon: “Derek Chauvin Trial”

Read Professor and Department Head Lewis Gordon's recent article, "Derek Chauvin Trial: 3 Questions America Needs to Ask About Seeking Racial Justice in a Court of Law."

**Excerpt from the article**

There are three questions I find important to consider as the trial unfolds. These questions address the legal, moral and political legitimacy of any verdict in the trial. I offer them from my perspective as an Afro-Jewish philosopher and political thinker who studies oppression, justice and freedom. They also speak to the divergence between how a trial is conducted, what rules govern it – and the larger issue of racial justice raised by George Floyd’s death after Derek Chauvin pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for more than nine minutes. They are questions that need to be asked.

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Drew Johnson: “Disjunctive Luminosity”

Read graduate student Drew Johnson's recent article in Thought: A Journal of Philosophy, "Disjunctive Luminosity."

*Abstract*

Williamson's influential anti‐luminosity argument aims to show that our own mental states are not “luminous,” and that we are thus “cognitively homeless.” Among other things, this argument represents a significant challenge to the idea that we enjoy basic self‐knowledge of our own occurrent mental states. In this paper, I summarize Williamson's anti‐luminosity argument, and discuss the role that the notion of “epistemic basis” plays in it. I argue that the anti‐luminosity argument relies upon a particular version of the basis‐relative safety condition on knowledge. This commitment is significant because basic self‐knowledge seemingly lacks any kind of distinct epistemic basis, such as inference, observation, testimony, etc., despite representing a genuine kind of knowledge of contingent matters of fact. I consider a disjunctivist account (due to Bar‐On and Johnson), according to which true basic self‐beliefs indeed lack an epistemic basis in any kind of epistemic method (such as inference), yet are still epistemically grounded in the mental states they concern. I argue that this account of self‐knowledge is compatible with standard understandings of the basis relative safety condition on knowledge, but rejects the particular version required by the anti‐luminosity argument.

 

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Ruth Garrett Millikan Graduate Fellowship Matching Challenge

A “match challenge” has been made in support of the Ruth Garrett Millikan Fellowship Fund. Anonymous donors have pledged $1000, which will be contributed to this fund by December 31 if others have collectively contributed that same amount by that date.

 

The Millikan Fellowship fund is used to support ABD grad students for a summer of dissertation writing or related professional development, by providing them with a sum that they’d otherwise earn by teaching a summer course. They also receive research funds to purchase books, pay for conference registration, and, where appropriate, travel. Thus far there have been four holders of the Fellowship: Andrew Tedder (2018), Drew Johnson (2019), Jordan Ochs (2019), and Ryo Tanaka (2020). This spring the Department of Philosophy will select another holder of the Fellowship for the summer of 2021. As the balance of the fund grows, we will get closer to being able to use the income it generates to support a grad student for a semester of dissertation writing, and then, eventually, for an entire dissertation year fellowship.

 

Please consider giving what you can.

Stewart Shapiro in 2019 Philosopher’s Annual

Stewart Shapiro

Stewart Shapiro’s article, ‘Actual and Potential Infinity,’ co-authored with Oystein Linnebo, and published in Nous, vol. 53 (pp. 160-191), has been selected by The Philosopher’s Annual for inclusion as one of the ten best philosophy articles published in 2019.

Abstract

The notion of potential infinity dominated in mathematical thinking about infinity from Aristotle until Cantor. The coherence and philosophical importance of the notion are defended. Particular attention is paid to the question of whether potential infinity is compatible with classical logic or requires a weaker logic, perhaps intuitionistic.

Recent and Forthcoming Graduate Student Publications

Heather Muraviov and Taylor Tate co-authored “Black Women Philosophers Conference at the CUNY-Graduate Center,” which uses the pedagogical framework developed by Fanonian scholar Erica Burman to review the conference. Their analysis appeared in the “Black Issues in Philosophy” series of the Blog of the APA.

https://blog.apaonline.org/2019/04/30/black-issues-in-philosophy-black-women-philosophers-conference-at-the-cuny-graduate-center/

 

Drew Johnson has two forthcoming articles:  “Hinge Epistemology, Radical Skepticism, and Domain Specific Skepticism,” The International Journal for the Study of Skepticism, doi 10.1163/22105700-20191302 and “Epistemological Disjunctivism: Perception, Expression, and Self-Knowledge” (With Dorit Bar-On). Forthcoming in New Issues in Epistemological Disjunctivism (2019), Doyle, C., Milburn, J., & Pritchard, D. (eds.). Routledge.

 

Recent graduate Jared Henderson has a forthcoming article, ‘A Neglected QUA Solution to the Fundamental Problem of Christology’, (co-authored with Jc Beall) in the journal, Faith & Philosophy.

 

Recent graduate Dana Francisco Miranda has an article titled “Review: Jessica Blatt’s Race and the Making of American Political Science,” forthcoming in The Journal of African American History. https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/toc/jaah/current